3 Tips To Choose The Right Career Direction

Wrote this for the company blog.. do check it out!

Metaphors of The Mind

Written by Sadaf Vidha, Psychologist at Type a Thought

It’s Result time and all boards like CBSE, ICSE and SSC are putting out their results. youngsters are now rushing from college to college, at least virtually, to secure admission.. it’s a highly competitive atmosphere right now, and all the fun had during vacations seems washed away!

We get many students on our online counseling website where we provide a free first session and career counseling, and they do seem very confused about what career direction to take! Everyone imaginable is giving them advice, be it 10th std or 12th std students. In fact, one of my co-counselors drew a parallel between the plight of our students and people who look for a change in career around the 30s. Regardless of whenever you want to decide a career direction, these three golden career rules can help you:

Skills and Interests: The…

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7 Whacky Ways to Control Cravings

I’ve written this one for my company blog 🙂

Metaphors of The Mind

All of us have struggled to keep off certain food – either we are watching our weight, or due to some health condition, or because our profession demands it. But it gets hard if we are surrounded by tasty looking food, doesn’t it?

Studies suggest that there is more than just one ‘type’ of eating. There are actually three types. There is emotional eating, external eating and biological eating.

As you guessed, emotional eating happens due to extreme emotions of sadness, happiness, guilt, anger and so on. External eating happens because in a situation, certain foods are consumed and so our environment gives us eating cues, even when we are not hungry. For example, having popcorn along with movies is such a classic that going without that is kind of unimaginable.

The Psychology of Eating (1)

So, what do you do when you get such sticky cravings? Here are some refreshingly new ways to manage…

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The solution to a fucked-up world: nicer kids

Wrote this for a co-blog. Do check it out!

Thought Puddlers

Teach our children to have empathy, through story-telling

Written by Sadaf Vidha

The children of today live in a challenging world. While the cruelty and bad news may not be more than the centuries before, we do have an ultra-focused world thatODs on sensational news. You have an app on the market each day which gives you the shortest version of the news in the fastest amount of time.
The difference then, lies in the way we perceive the world. Earlier, in the times of war, there was violence enough in the world, and no politician or new agency would want to dare add to the polarity at such times. Now however, with the problems being lesser and people’s lives busier and also people being easily influencial through media, encouraging polarity can happen easily, can be highly justified as people do not have the time for in-depth investigation and…

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What is Sunday neurosis and why should you care?

Do take a look 🙂

Metaphors of The Mind

Victor Frankl, a famous existentialist, philosopher and psychiatrist, suggested that a lot of people in today’s time suffer from Sunday neurosis. The whole week goes by in work and responsibilities, and it is on Sunday that we realize how mundane and empty we feel. To get away from this feeling, we indulge in eating, shopping or some other compensating behaviour and thus, start a new week withholding our emptiness, therefore crashing one day, with either depression or suicide or both.

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On International day of happiness, let’s look at why we are not happy. Under the #battletheblues campaign, we have discovered that way too many of us feel depressed and empty inside.

The only solution to emptiness is to find meaning. What really matters to you? Do you do a job where you are crushing your passion, your values everyday? Are you stuck with a loveless marriage?

As much as these…

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The costliest thing in India that inflation can’t explain: Having an opinion

Outrage is the new Indian hobby. Initially, social media would outrage over issues that required outraging, like rapes and brutal statements by politicians and what not, but now a days, we seem to outrage without thinking. Or worse, we outrage to drown out minority voices. Minority here stands not for muslims, but any person or group of people who want something different than what the mainstream does, something that is not an illegal or immoral thing to ask for.

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When Aamir Khan said his wife suggested moving out of India, he voiced the feelings of not just Muslims, but all sorts of groups who have felt targeted and the Government has done nothing to tell them they will be looked after. These groups include, but are not limited to: women, queer population, Sikhs, SC and ST population, tribals, people in high-distress areas, people affected by man-made and natural disasters, people under the poverty line, people with mental and physical disability, people affected by crimes, people stuck in human trafficking and child labour, children and young adults stuck in observation homes, and so on.

There were some Muslims who came out and said that they have had nothing but love and respect in India, so how could Aamir Khan say what he did. First of all, it’s good that their experience was nice, but because he expressed a different opinion, that does not mean that he is wrong. He has all right to say what he feels, and it is not irresponsible, because he just expressed a sentiment, that many people have been feeling, and not flung mud at anyone blaming them for it.

The outrage he harnessed proved his point that we are inching towards intolerance and bursting at our seems. But it also proved the convenient duality we had: We are happy to garner NRI investments, but loathe when someone talks of leaving the country. We want to champion minority rights, but we don’t care when Muslim women say that they want changes in the Muslim personal law. Perhaps he poked us where it hurts: our denial blind spot.

This divided attention and lack of peace-making efforts from central authorities (but harrowing communal comments from politicians, instead), speak of a psychological divide that was only at the fringes before but now is seeping in everywhere. There are some who are not divided but they simply do not care, and I can’t decide which is worse.

In light of the recent incidents, having an opinion is perhaps the costliest in India. It is much easier if you want to be a mule, absorb consumer products and mindlessly churn our revenue and tax.